Central District Projects

Loop 202 (South Mountain Freeway)

32nd Street Traffic Interchange Study

ADOT received public input on the proposed 32nd Street interchange between May 2 and June 4, 2018. All public input will be included in the Environmental Reevaluation Report, which will be submitted to the Federal Highway Administration for their consideration. ADOT anticipates a final decision will be announced this fall.
Have questions about the 32nd Street Interchange Study? Contact us:

The recommendation to remove a traffic interchange (TI) at 32nd Street and the Loop 202 South Mountain Freeway was made during the development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) by the South Mountain Citizens Advisory Team (CAT) in 2005. Based on the input received from the CAT and the City of Phoenix, ADOT agreed to no longer study a potential interchange at 32nd Street. In 2006, the City of Phoenix conducted a traffic circulation study to evaluate the impacts of the proposed freeway on the local street system, including the elimination of the interchange at 32nd Street. The City study found no adverse effects on the local street system from the freeway with or without an interchange.

After the Record of Decision (ROD) and prior to construction starting on the project, ADOT and the freeway developer, Connect 202 Partners (C202P) participated in a Public Input meeting for the freeway in the Ahwatukee Foothills Village. During the fall 2016 meeting, the community, including local and state officials, expressed an interest in re-considering the need for an interchange at 32nd Street. The concerns raised by the community included the concern that traffic would increase substantially on Liberty Lane and Lakewood Parkway (both minor collectors) because vehicles currently using 32nd Street would need to get to 24th or 40th streets to access the new freeway. This additional traffic would pass directly by a number of local schools.

More recently, the project team has received numerous requests from the local community and schools to revisit construction of an interchange at 32nd Street. The study of this interchange has also been supported by elected officials and the Maricopa Association of Governments.

In response to this, ADOT requested C202P to draft preliminary design plans to determine the feasibility of adding an interchange without acquiring additional properties. Also, ADOT began an environmental re-evaluation to determine the feasibility and analyze any changes in environmental and social impacts of adding an interchange at 32nd Street.

Proposed Interchange Concept

32nd-St-Rendering-Web

Questions and Answers

What is the purpose and need of the traffic interchange?

The purpose of the 32nd Street traffic interchange would be to improve access to and mobility within the Ahwatukee Foothills Village. Benefits of this traffic interchange would include

  • maintaining current trip distributions by providing access to the freeway from all of the north-south arterial streets that currently connect to Pecos Road.
  • reducing traffic volumes on the adjacent interchanges at 40th and 24th streets.
  • providing a nearby access point in the event of an emergency for the many local schools in the 32nd Street area.

Why wasn’t a 32nd Street interchange in previous construction plans?

During the alternatives development and screening process for the EIS, ADOT worked with local agencies and the CAT to evaluate each of the interchange locations. During the evaluation for 32nd Street, the City of Phoenix and CAT recommended that ADOT remove the interchange from further consideration due to the undesirable residential displacements (over 100 homes) and freeway access proximity to a nearby high school. At the time (2006), the City of Phoenix conducted a traffic circulation study to evaluate the impacts of the proposed freeway without a 32nd Street traffic interchange on the local street system. The City of Phoenix study found no adverse effects on the local street system from the freeway with or without an interchange.

Why does ADOT need another environmental study for a possible addition of a 32nd Street traffic interchange? Wasn’t it studied in the original Environmental Impact Statement?

The traffic interchange was not included in the Final EIS/ROD; its inclusion at this point constitutes a change in scope that must be cleared environmentally.

What does the environmental study consist of and how long will it take to complete?

The environmental study will consider all of the elements considered in the FEIS/ROD. The depth of analysis within each individual environmental section will depend on the impacts associated with the traffic interchange. It’s anticipated the study, which began in February 2018, will be completed in August 2018 (approximately six months).

When will a final decision will be made on whether or not to add a 32nd Street traffic interchange?

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and ADOT will evaluate the environmental re-evaluation and public feedback this summer and determine the outcome in fall 2018.

Will ADOT/C202P need to acquire additional right-of-way/residential properties to add the interchange? If not, how close will the ramps be to residential homes near 32nd Street?

Adding on- and off-ramps would result in the need to acquire small areas of drainage easement and HOA common area, but no residential properties.  Since the freeway was reduced to 8 lanes, no additional residential properties will be acquired. Sound walls are shown on the schematic plans, but would not extend all the way to 32nd Street, only overlap approximately 100 feet at the ramp merge area. The new ramps would be approximately 30 feet from the residential boundary walls.

Will this interchange be constructed during South Mountain Freeway construction, or will it be built after the freeway is opened? At the earliest, when would construction of the interchange begin?

Construction timing would be determined after a decision to include the TI has been made. The TI could be constructed in conjunction with the freeway, but under no circumstance would the inclusion of the TI delay the opening of the entire project in late 2019.

How can constituents provide input?

ADOT received public input on the proposed 32nd Street interchange between May 2 and June 4, 2018. All public input will be included in the Environmental Reevaluation Report, which will be submitted to the Federal Highway Administration for their consideration. ADOT anticipates a final decision will be announced this fall.

Have questions about the 32nd Street Interchange Study? Contact us:

What is the cost to add a 32nd Street interchange? How will it be funded?

The cost of the new interchange is estimated to be $10 million. It would be funded through project contingency and/or regional funds.

What is the cost to do another environmental study?

The cost of the environmental study is approximately $100,000.

If a decision is made to build an interchange, will it affect the timeline to open the South Mountain Freeway by late 2019?

If the interchange is built, it will not affect the opening of the freeway in late 2019.

What are the anticipated potential traffic impacts on local and arterial streets with or without a traffic interchange at 32nd Street?

As part of the traffic interchange (TI) study, ADOT will consider traffic operations at the interchange intersections and along the freeway. One of the primary benefits of the interchange would be to more evenly distribute vehicles among three interchanges instead of two and reduce trips using local roads such as Liberty Lane and Lakewood Parkway.

With or without the 32nd Street traffic interchange, local roads will operate effectively.  The effects of not having the interchange were initially assessed in 2006 by the City and then reexamined again in 2017.  The more recent 2017 traffic circulation study conducted by the City concluded, among other things, that there would not be significant increase in traffic on local roads (cut-through) because of the lack of an interchange at 32nd Street.  

The table below provides traffic projections for locations in the study area for the scenario without and with the traffic interchange at 32nd Street. The projections show that the introduction of an interchange at 32nd Street would reduce traffic at the 40th and 24th street TIs as well as reduce traffic along 40th and 24th streets north of the freeway.

Projected Traffic Volumes, 2040 (average daily vehicles):
Location Without 32nd Street TI With 32nd Street TI %-change

40th Street TI (total of all four on- and off-ramps)

34,400

31,300

-9%

24th Street TI (total of all four on- and off-ramps)

19,400

17,500

-10%

32nd Street TI (total of all four on- and off-ramps)

0

14,600

NA

Chandler Boulevard east of 32nd Street

13,300

7,800

-41%

Chandler Boulevard west of 32nd Street

6,800

7,000

3%

32nd Street south of Frye Road

1,200

1,300

91%

40th Street south of Frye Road

28,700

26,400

-8%

24th Street south of Frye Road

6,500

4,800

-26%


If approved, what additional traffic control measures will be considered along 32nd Street?

The City will continue to analyze the traffic patterns post South Mountain Freeway opening.If traffic patterns change along 32nd Street the City will evaluate options to mitigate traffic.

If approved, will the existing High-intensity Activated crossWalK (HAWK) signal at 32nd Street and Liberty Lane become a traffic signal to accommodate residential/pedestrian traffic?

The intersection of Liberty Lane and 32nd Street does not meet the warrants for a traffic signal. The pedestrian HAWK signal at this location will be left in place and reviewed for effectiveness after the construction of the South Mountain Freeway.

Could a frontage road or perimeter road be constructed instead?

Frontage roads between 24th and 40th streets were evaluated as part of the study. Due to right-of-way, drainage, and utility constraints associated with frontage roads, this is a significantly less desirable alternative than adding an interchange at 32nd Street.

Would a traffic interchange at 32nd Street modify the Shared Use Path?

Adding an interchange within ADOT right-of-way would impact the width of the shared-use path. The path is planned to be 20 feet wide. With an interchange, the path would be reduced to about 10 feet wide, which still meets City of Phoenix standard requirements.

If approved, would the TI result in additional noise impacts?

A noise analysis will be conducted as part of the interchange study. If needed, sound walls will be adjusted to provide mitigation based on the results of the study.

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Civil Rights

Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other nondiscrimination laws and authorities, ADOT does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. Persons that require a reasonable accommodation based on language or disability should contact ADOT’s Civil Rights Office at civilrightsoffice@azdot.gov. Requests should be made as early as possible to ensure the State has an opportunity to address the accommodation.

De acuerdo con el Título VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964, la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA por sus siglas en inglés) y otras normas y leyes antidiscriminatorias, el Departamento de Transporte de Arizona (ADOT) no discrimina por motivos de raza, color, origen nacional, sexo, edad o discapacidad. Las personas que requieran asistencia (dentro de lo razonable) ya sea por el idioma o discapacidad deben ponerse en contacto con la Oficina de Derechos Civiles de ADOT en civilrightsoffice@azdot.gov. Las solicitudes deben hacerse lo más antes posible para asegurar que el Estado tenga la oportunidad de hacer los arreglos necesarios.