Driver Services

Arizona Voluntary Travel ID

Frequently Asked Questions 

The Frequently Asked Questions will be updated as more information becomes available.

Am I required to obtain a Travel ID?

No. Arizona residents have an option to purchase a Travel ID.

Can I use my current Arizona driver license or identification card to board an aircraft?

Yes. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has said IDs from states offering credentials complying with the federal REAL ID Act will be accepted until Oct. 1, 2020.

Can I use my current Arizona driver license or identification card to enter restricted federal buildings and military bases?

Yes. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has said IDs from states offering credentials complying with the federal REAL ID Act will be accepted until Oct. 1, 2020.

How much will a Travel ID cost?

The cost of a Travel ID is $25 (initial application and renewal).

Will the Travel ID contain a radio frequency identification (RFID) chip?

No, state law prohibits the Travel ID from containing a RFID chip.

How long will my Travel ID be valid?

Federal requirements require the Travel ID to be valid for a maximum of eight years. Exceptions apply, including drivers age 65 or older whose licenses are currently valid for five years. For non-U.S. citizens who have authorized legal presence the expiration date will be based off the immigration documents presented, not to exceed eight years.

What documents do I need to apply for a Travel ID?

You will need one document to establish birth or legal presence; one document to verify your Social Security number; and two documents to establish residency in Arizona.

Arizona Travel ID Identification Requirements, 40-5144

I had reason to get a new Arizona driver license or ID and decided against getting the Travel ID. My ID says “Not for federal identification.” Does that mean I can’t board an aircraft or enter restricted federal buildings and military bases?

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has said IDs from states offering credentials complying with the federal REAL ID Act will be accepted until Oct. 1, 2020. Even if a driver license or ID says “NOT FOR FEDERAL IDENTIFICATION," DHS has said it will be accepted through that date.

 

The Arizona Ombudsman – Citizens Aide helps you resolve ongoing issues with State Agencies.

Civil Rights

Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other nondiscrimination laws and authorities, ADOT does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. Persons that require a reasonable accommodation based on language or disability should contact ADOT’s Civil Rights Office at civilrightsoffice@azdot.gov. Requests should be made as early as possible to ensure the State has an opportunity to address the accommodation.

De acuerdo con el Título VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964, la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA por sus siglas en inglés) y otras normas y leyes antidiscriminatorias, el Departamento de Transporte de Arizona (ADOT) no discrimina por motivos de raza, color, origen nacional, sexo, edad o discapacidad. Las personas que requieran asistencia (dentro de lo razonable) ya sea por el idioma o discapacidad deben ponerse en contacto con la Oficina de Derechos Civiles de ADOT en civilrightsoffice@azdot.gov. Las solicitudes deben hacerse lo más antes posible para asegurar que el Estado tenga la oportunidad de hacer los arreglos necesarios.